092 RCI 0417

RCI April 2017

PITCHED ROOFING 092 APRIL 2017 RCIMAG.COM Marley Eternit has launched what it describes as a ground-breaking new Dry Verge system that will make it quicker and easier for contractors and housebuilders to fit to NHBC and British Standards, whilst offering outstanding performance and durability. The new Universal Dry Verge is compatible with all three major interlocking tile types, large standard, medium format (15” by 9”) and large format thin leading edge, as well as Marley Eternit’s own Lincoln clay interlocking pantile. This means contractors only need to buy and carry one type of dry verge for use with the majority of manufacturers’ interlocking tiles and merchants can consolidate their stock holding with just one system instead of multiple versions. Marley Eternit’s new system has also been designed to be much easier to fit than existing dry verge products. Developed in conjunction with roofing contractors, it includes a quick starter-verge fixing that can be installed even if the gutter is already in place. This provides an easy-to-install, robust method of securing the first verge unit – Zink Copper Stainless 01992 801927 www.almhm.co.uk providing subtle, yet visible evidence to housebuilders and the NHBC of a correct and secure fix. Marley Eternit’s new Universal Dry Verge has been designed with a unique internal rail system and leading edge hinge so it can be used with the majority of popular interlocking tile types. In addition, the new Universal Dry Verge is made from a durable form of polypropylene, which has excellent weather resistance, particularly to freeze / thaw cycles and UV degradation. It includes unique drainage features which help correctly channel rainwater to prevent gable end staining. www.marleyeternit.co.uk/universal dryverge Westminster slate addresses the house Roof tile manufacturer Redland says it is setting new standards in large format interlocking clay tiles with the introduction of the Westminster Slate. Redland says the Westminster Slate offers contractors efficiencies in both materials and installation, plus delivers the quality and aesthetic of traditional clay tiles but more cost-effectively as its size and interlocking design mean that only ten tiles are needed per m² compared to 60 for traditional clay plain tiles. Appearance is also key with the Westminster Slate, according to Redland, as the clay tile’s finely tapered leading edge gives it an “exceptionally slim appearance”. Redland says this thin form, combined with a hidden cut-back interlock, raised nail holes and custom-engineered head, contributes toward the slate achieving low pitches down to 17.5 degrees. As is common with all Redland roofing products, the Westminster Slate clay tiles have been subject to rigorous freeze-thaw, wind-uplift and strength tests, as well as being put through their paces at the manufacturer’s wind tunnel where they were subjected to high wind and driving rain to test their weather-tightness performance. The overall dimensions of the slate are 480 x 326mm, with a cover width of 280mm and headlap range between 110mm and 140mm. Concluding, Redland feels its Westminster Slate – like its Redland 49 small-format cambered tile which became the roof covering of choice and helped rebuild the capital in the immediate post-war period – gives developers, contractors, specifiers and local authorities the opportunity to roof and re-roof relatively inexpensively; while realising all the high performance and aesthetics of clay tiles. www.redland.co.uk/westminster The game changer Young people in Hampshire are benefitting from a brand new community hub combining standout design with increased functionality. A highlight of the unique build is the blend of roof and façade achieved through the specification of Thrutone Fibre Cement Slate from Marley Eternit. The Point, an award-winning two storey youth centre in Tadley, saw architects Ayre Chamberlain Gaunt enlist the help of local young people to collaborate in the design of the striking building, complete with dark grey exterior. To deliver its contemporary standout design, the architects required a roofing solution which could also be used on the building’s façade to create a seamless exterior finish, delivering maximum aesthetic impact. In response to the bespoke brief, Thrutone Fibre Cement Slate from Marley Eternit was specified; providing a smooth dark grey appearance to deliver a strong visual appeal, while its lightweight properties meant it was suitable for use on both the roof and façade. Oliver Wood, associate director at Ayre Chamberlain Gaunt, explained the brief behind the project: “We wanted to create a landmark building that would serve local young people, while also being at the core of the wider community. Yet, we also wanted to challenge the status quo of youth centres by creating a truly original building, designed in collaboration with the very people who would be using it. “Local contractor Francis Construction was commissioned to build the youth centre, and worked to deliver a bold finish which contrasted dark grey tones against flashes of timber to create a real focal point among the surrounding area. Having used Marley Eternit products on a number of previous builds we were already aware of the breadth of its range. Marley Eternit’s Thrutone Fibre Cement Slate is lightweight enough to be used on the building façade without compromising the strong aesthetic appeal we were looking for.” Furthermore, Thrutone Fibre Cement Slate offers a minimum pitch down to 15°, while also achieving BES 6001 ‘Very Good’ rating to gain credits under BREEAM and CFSH, and is a 100% recyclable building material. Oliver Wood explained the impact the striking design has had: “The feedback we have received on the project has been incredibly positive, with some people even comparing the building’s exterior to a stealth bomber. Working with young people from the project’s onset we have been able to create a youth centre that effortlessly showcases that creating functional buildings need not mean aesthetics have to be compromised.” Charlotte Hughes, campaign manager at Marley Eternit, added: “A key benefit of the fibre cement range is its ability to be used on both roof and façade and blend the two seamlessly – as demonstrated on this striking build, providing something truly valuable to the local community.” Testament to The Point’s unique design, the £860,000 project, which can hold up to 100 young people aged 11 to 19, was awarded the RIBA Journal MacEwen Award which celebrates architecture for the common good. www.marleyeternit.co.uk/slates The Westminster Slate is available in City Black, Cardinal Red and Old College Red The Point youth centre delivers award-winning design with Thrutone slates


RCI April 2017
To see the actual publication please follow the link above