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RCI December 2017

SIG ROOFING IN FOCUS “It pays to get your quotes right” There are many steps a company can take to win new business; from issuing quotations, to local advertising, social media activity, sharing customer referrals and much more. All of these activities can greatly impact the growth of your business; however, quotations are the one item that allows you to sell your business to a customer with a current roofing job. What more could we ask for than someone who comes to us specifically, tells us they may consider using our services, and explains exactly what they’re looking for? All the buying signals are there! So, when it comes to issuing quotations, it’s a real opportunity to stand out from the crowd and win that all important new business. When you issue a quotation, you have the chance to showcase your business. You’ll probably find yourself competing against two or three other companies for the same job, therefore, not only does your quote need to set yourself apart, it needs to reflect the true quality of your service. So, how do you compile quotes that will win you work? Be specific: Firstly, let’s distinguish between a quotation and an estimate. An estimate is usually a ‘best guess of price’, and used to give a quick ballpark figure – meaning the final price could be higher or lower. A quotation on the other hand is an offer to do a job for an exact price; if accepted, it’s legally binding. When compiling quotes, therefore, it’s important to consider all elements of the job. Whilst you want to win the job with a competitive price, you need to make sure that all your costs are covered to allow you to make an appropriate profit. Planning and preparation are key. When to quote: The answer to this is ‘as quickly as you can’. The potential customer will want to make a decision quickly and is likely to have requested two or three quotations from different companies. Producing a quote quickly is your chance to show how your business will perform if you win the job and it will give you a competitive edge. It’s also better for you to quote while the job is fresh in your mind – it will help with accuracy and it will be quicker to produce. The detail: Your quote should include the price accompanied by a breakdown of the items that make up that price; as a minimum including labor and material costs, quantities, warranties, VAT etc. By including plenty of details, you won’t leave your customer second-guessing what’s included and what isn’t, and may avoid confusion or dispute later. Your quote will be a factor in who your customer decides should do the work – and not just because of the price. More detail will gain more trust and peace of mind with the customer. Materials: Assuming you’ve already evaluated the size and condition of the roof and taken photos and measurements, it should be easy to estimate the cost of materials. Itemise everything and check that all materials are covered in your quote, including any supplementary items such as sealants, underlays etc. Additional items: Charging a mark-up above your labor and material costs can help you project manage the job effectively and cover the running costs of your business, such as administration, accounting, business liability insurance fees. You need to be clear how much this will be when determining the final price. Warranties are also important and need to be checked carefully and included for every product. By choosing materials that are covered by a single package warranty, not only will you be providing top quality roofing products, you and your customer will be guaranteed simple and secure protection. Other information: It’s a good idea to include a timeline for the project’s completion, and even outline your policy for weather-related delays. Permits, insurance and any additional safety measures should also be clearly spelled out as well as payment terms. Be clear if a deposit is required and when the remaining payment is due and in what form. Make sure the final price includes VAT if appropriate, and include a validity date if you’re only prepared to complete the work within a set time period. Presentation: Taking a professional, polished approach to presenting your quote is important, and there are various software packages that will help do this and speed you up. It could even be a Word document that simply requires copying and pasting certain parts of the information. Needless to say, handwritten quotes are now a thing of the past. A duplicate copy that the customer can sign and return is also useful. Quoting for new roofing work takes time and effort, so it pays to maximise your chances every time. Winning work is not always about price, so when quoting, it pays to get it right. www.sigroofing.co.uk 024 RCIMAG.COM DECEMBER 2017 By Janine Brady, marketing manager at SIG Roofing


RCI December 2017
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