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RCI January 2018

LRWA VIEWPOINT purpose, they should look for the following. Liquid manufacturers should have a third party accredited quality management system such as ISO 9001, which ensures the product is manufactured to a consistent specification. Manufacturers should also have a UK registered office, which dispels any concerns of not having any support on the ground if a product is imported from overseas. A technical team based in the UK is vital to ensure product and application advice can be given if required. Manufacturers should provide evidence of a system’s life expectancy of ten years as a minimum, backed-up by third party accreditation. Application guidelines must also be readily available with access routes to system training for the contractor. Manufacturers should offer guidance and support to merchants and contractors as to the training options available – such as the accredited courses offered by the LRWA, led by a specialist team. A liquid manufacturer should also have a complaints procedure in place, providing peace of mind for the contractor and a point of contact if anything should go wrong on a project. A company’s financial status and trading entity details should also be accessible. It is worthwhile for any contractor to consider what service a manufacturer offers, aside from the product benefits, before specifying any liquid waterproofing system. Time for training To ensure quality standards remain in a fast-growing industry, system training is vital. The difficulty is, there is no set regulation on training in roofing, so it’s notoriously difficult to ensure all operatives work at the same level on the application of the different liquid systems available. We all know the skills shortage is prominent in our industry, and lack of training can also have a knock-on effect when trying to recruit a skilled workforce. But by achieving NVQ Level 2 Diploma in Liquid Waterproofing promotes quality standards to both clients and end users. Some may argue the investment of time for an operative to be offsite training can be difficult to manage, however, the long-term benefits of quality training must be considered as a major benefit to all involved, and it ensures contractors have the appropriate health and safety knowledge to competently perform duties on site. In addition, once the NVQ2 has been obtained, operatives can apply for the blue Construction Skills Certification Scheme (CSCS) skilled worker card – which demonstrates contractors meet the legal requirements necessary to practise the trade. There are many organisations that offer courses in all varieties of systems from single ply to hot melts and liquids – however contractors must be extremely vigilant when choosing a training provider as the standards of quality can vary considerably. It’s always advisable to seek a recognised industry body, like the LRWA, to deliver specialist training led by an experienced team. With more liquid products coming into the market, it’s important contractors make the right choices from product to application copy An informed choice With more liquid products emerging onto the market, it’s important for contractors to make the right choices from product to application, to ensure quality standards continue to be met. It’s important to remember there is plenty of advice and guidance available from trade associations like the LRWA to help protect them from potentially choosing and installing a substandard product. JANUARY 050 2018 RCIMAG.COM The LRWA consists of the leading manufacturers of liquid applied waterproofing, approved contractors and related materials suppliers. www.lrwa.org.uk As we refurbish and build new railways as part of our aim to increase connectivity between our towns and cities, operators and infrastructure providers are seeking innovative materials that minimise the impact of the works. Wolfin, part of the Icopal Group, says it offers an effective waterproofing solution in response to this with its Wolfin IB sheet membrane. Wolfin IB is an entirely homogenous thermoplastic waterproofing membrane that is resistant to bitumen, flux and mineral oils, as well as kerosene and acids. It is UV, microbe and red algae resistant ensuring longevity while offering great flexibility with elongation at break of 300%. It is said to have a proven track record extending back over 50 years of long-term durability in different climatic zones, and lifelong weldability using solvent or hot air. In the case of rail improvements, Wolfin IB is a great solution for waterproofing refurbished or replacement bridge structures on the rail lines to stop leakages from damaging the tracks underneath. Compared to torch-on competitor products, Wolfin IB is applied as a sheet, which is faster and easier to install as it requires less labour and equipment. This helps to both minimise costs and avoid any project delays. Furthermore, the potential to prefabricate larger modules in the factory not only saves time on site, but makes installation less weather sensitive while helping to improve the quality of workmanship and save waste. If a project requires prefabricated modules, specifiers can request these to up to 9 x 15 metres in size. For major rail infrastructure projects in particular, welding the sheets of Wolfin IB into larger units in advance can really help to speed up progress on site. Rod Friel, business development manager of Wolfin, said: “We’ve seen an increase in business within the rail industry in recent years, largely due to the faster installation times of the Wolfin IB product. With increases in high-profile expansions and new developments, our customers have needed a quick solution to waterproofing bridges over tracks so that works cause minimal disruption. “We are also pleased to offer extensive technical support, including details bespoke to the project, copies of test reports and an overnight delivery service when required.” Wolfin IB is PADS registered for use on Network Rail infrastructure and holds EN 13956 CEWaterproofing of Roofs and EN 13967 CE-Waterproofing of Buildings certification. www.wolfin.co.uk Waterproofing for rail: a quicker solution


RCI January 2018
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