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RCI March 2018

Project1_Layout 1 07/05/2013 SIG ROOFING IN FOCUS Why we never play chicken with our Core Range We recently saw one of the UK’s leading fast-food chains, KFC, run out of chicken and have to shut the majority of its restaurants - highlighting just how quickly, and badly, things can go wrong for any supplier. Marketing manager Janine Brady looks at how SIG Roofing ensures a continual supply of its Core Range so that roofing contractors aren’t left with a finger-licking fiasco You’d think that it couldn’t happen in this day and age that a company, which is famous for one thing can’t actually get that one thing to its 900- odd restaurants across the UK, or that it would cause wide-scale closures of restaurants for days on end in some cases. The fact that chicken-gate made the national news, with reporters from the likes of the BBC filming outside closed restaurants and talking to disgruntled customers, shows just how unbelievable the situation became. KFC’s management tried to put a brave face on things and pointed out that a change from its existing logistics partner to a new one was at the heart of the problem, and the company trotted out the usual PR crisis management statements about working with its partners to rectify the situation as a priority, apologising for any inconvenience. As a specialist supplier of products, expertise and support for pitched, flat and industrial roofing, we know that if we let customers down, even once, they will have to go elsewhere out of necessity. And, if they go away, there’s the risk that they will not come back. From a business point of view, it’s always better to look after customers in the first place, and this is why the situation with KFC reminds us of the importance of the decision our business took to introduce a Core Range of essential roofing materials in our 120 plus branches nathionwide. This range is available so that roofing contractors can get what they need, when they need it and, in the vast majority of cases, delivered where and when they need it. It covers the everyday essential roofing products for pitched and flat roofing, such as slate, batten and timber, GRP, repair compounds and solutions, insulation, liquid waterproofing, torch-on felt, fibre cement, underlays, lead and lead replacement, rainwater, nails and fixings, roof window flashings, and tools and PPE. If you explore each category in a bit more depth, you’ll find a wide spread of products. For example, it’s not just flat metric interlocking concrete tiles, but ½ round, multi-angle and 1/3 round ridge tiles. The same goes for the type of underlay, with air permeable and vapour permeable options, which come in a selection of the most popular sizes. Similary, when it comes to liquid waterproofing for flat roofs, there’s product lines available including anthracite, fabric and joining tape. 022 MARCH 2018 RCIMAG.COM “We know that if we let customers down, even once, they will have to go elsewhere out of necessity. And, if they go away, there’s the risk that they will not come back” and size of our network has enabled us to help roofing contractors to source tiles from across our branch network. Our branches have also worked closely with roofing contractors to find alternatives in situations where a solution needed to be found immediately. Our Core Range has proven to be a commitment that works very well and that roofing contractors can rely on – which is more than can be said for where they might go for their lunch! Runs like clockwork Our simple commitment to ensuring that the Core Range is constantly available is based on having robust processes in place right across our business. This enables us to work seamlessly with suppliers to have surety around the continuity of supply, which results in making life as easy as possible for roofing contractors who know they can walk into their local branch and get exactly what they need. There’s a lot of hard work by a team of dedicated people to make sure everything runs like clockwork and, in situations, such as a manufacturer supply issue, things don’t go according to plan, they are quick to act and resolve any problems before they affect supply PIR insulation is a good example of where a problem in a supply chain occurred, but everyone rallied round. A fire in a factory in Europe led to a shortage of insulation, and we went through a period of working even closer than usual with customers to understand their needs so that we could liaise with the manufacturer to get stock allocated on a priority basis to help customers to manage their workloads. The other obvious one to mention is concrete roof tiles. This has caused a number of problems right across the industry. Manufacturers were working flat out to supply products, but, on some lines, the lead time had gone past the 20-week mark. The buying power that comes with a business of our size played a big part in us maintaining a supply of tiles – but the strength


RCI March 2018
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