Page 69

RCI March 2018

Project1_Layout 1 07/05/2013 IFLAT ROOFING & WATERPROOFING SYSTEMS The resurgence of the mastic asphalt industry Malcolm Grinstead, director of the Mastic Asphalt Council, speaks to RCI about the progress that has been made in the mastic asphalt sector since his appointment 12 months ago, and n use for centuries, mastic asphalt has an illustrious history as one of the most established and well proven waterproofing membrane systems currently available. Traditionally consisting of graded limestone aggregate bound together with bitumen, today’s mastic asphalt systems are now manufactured using advanced polymer modified formulations to ensure all the performance characteristics of traditional asphalt systems, with the added benefits of increased flexibility, enhanced handling and sustainability. The incorporation of modern polymers into mastic asphalt systems has helped lead to its resurgence in the construction industry. The Mastic Asphalt Council (MAC) is the trade association for the mastic asphalt industry in the UK. Representing more than 70 companies operating in the sector, MAC members include mastic asphalt manufacturers, specialist application contractors, and associated suppliers of equipment and services. It has been a year since Malcolm Grinstead took up the position as company director of MAC, replacing the council’s long-serving director and secretary, John Blowers, who formed the backbone of the council for more than two decades before he sadly passed away in April 2016. Malcolm brought a wealth of technical expertise and experience to his role as head of MAC, having worked in the construction industry for over 45 years. He amassed 25 years’ service with Briggs Amasco, covering all aspects of contracting, and also worked at Permanite Asphalt/IKO for 20 years in both technical advisory and mastic 066 MARCH 2018 RCIMAG.COM discusses what the future holds asphalt product management roles. When Malcolm first joined MAC, he set out a number of aims. His overarching aim was to achieve growth and sustainability in all areas of the mastic asphalt industry, by increasing awareness of the benefits of a traditional product into one which has very much evolved to meet and surpass the challenges of the roofing and wider construction industry today. “One of our key objectives is to raise awareness amongst architects, surveyors, specifiers and the younger generation about the huge performance benefits of today’s mastic asphalt systems,” Malcolm said. “Mastic asphalt has a wonderful heritage, and we have examples where it has provided effective waterproofing for some 100 years or so, but perhaps what is not as well-known is its environmental credentials.” CarbonZero standard Mastic asphalt is carbon neutral and ten years ago, the sector became the first industry in the world to achieve the CarbonZero standard. Mastic asphalt is 100% recyclable at the end of its life, and it is able to be recycled and broken down into hardcore or used in roof screeds. It reduces carbon emissions and its seamless nature means it can be easily spot repaired, eliminating the need for costly wholesale replacement. The flowing characteristics of mastic asphalt make it easy for installing contractors to tackle roof surfaces which are complex, stepped or with multiple protrusions. In comparison, failure is often found at the point of detail work in felt or sheet membrane waterproofing systems, where roofers have cut and fixed the material to the roof in question. Furthermore, mastic asphalt is an ideal solution for green roofs. A green roof system laid with a mastic asphalt waterproofing system enhances the environment, controls storm water run-off and reduces noise and heat transmission by upgrading the acoustic and thermal performance of a roof. Mastic asphalt eliminates the need for root barriers – a requisite for alternative roofing systems – and it offers safe application as it is non-toxic and non-flammable with no need for naked flame. The material can be delivered to site direct from the factory, at the correct temperature for installation. Hot charge transporters and insulated dumpers make this possible and one 15 tonne hot charge delivery vehicle can supply enough mastic asphalt to lay 300m2 of material to a depth of 20mm, making it ideal for application onto larger roofs, as well as for intricate detail work. Malcolm continued: “We’ve carried out a great deal of work over the last 12 months to get the word out there about the performance, application and durability benefits of mastic asphalt, and I’ve certainly noticed a marked increase in the number of calls to the council from specifiers. We’ve increased our membership by 20% since the start of 2017, and in turn, increased our marketing budgets to help us in our quest to get in front of a specification audience. “We’ve launched a new MAC website and recently held an event in March at St Paul’s Cathedral in London to relaunch mastic asphalt roofing to architects and specifiers. The venue itself has very special significance for us as mastic asphalt was first laid on the main walkway beneath the cathedral dome back in A typical mastic asphalt application Malcolm Grinstead, director of the Mastic Asphalt Council


RCI March 2018
To see the actual publication please follow the link above