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FLAT ROOFING & WATERPROOFING SYSTEMS Project1_Layout 1 07/05/2013 1Project1_01992 Zink Copper Stainless 801927 www.almhm.co.uk SFS flat roofing catalogue now available Thermal imaging: technology to reduce risk and add value The construction industry is said to face many challenges. One of these is around delivering projects on time and on budget. Refurbishment projects is one area where accurately predicting cost and time is notoriously difficult to unforeseen factors coming into play when a project starts. For example, typically as a result of stripping away part of the building and finding something unexpected. Thermal imaging is one area where technology is reportedly helping to overcome this and is now a key part of Sika’s roof refurbishment offering. Infrared thermography (IRT) and thermal imaging technology detect radiation in the long-infrared range of the electromagnetic spectrum (roughly 9,000–14,000 nanometers or 9–14 μm). This produces an image called a thermogram. Since infrared radiation is emitted by all objects with a temperature above absolute zero, thermography makes it possible to see an environment with or without visible illumination. The amount of radiation emitted by an object increases with temperature. Therefore, thermography allows you to see variations in temperature. When viewed through a thermal imaging camera, warm objects stand out well against cooler backgrounds. Typical thermography uses include firefighters who use thermography to see through smoke, to find people, and to localise the base of a fire. Maintenance technicians use thermography to locate overheating joints and sections of power lines, which are a sign of impending failure. In the construction industry, it has been traditionally used to identify heat leaks in faulty thermal insulation and to improve the efficiency of heating and air-conditioning units. Sika has been using thermal imaging technology since 2014, and it has predominantly used thermal imaging on refurbishment projects to track the extent of damage to the existing roof build up. It is said to provide a much more comprehensive survey report, and enables the creation of a more appropriate and suitable specification. It also reportedly helps to highlight, in advance, any issues that would have otherwise been unforeseen, helping to reduce risk and avoid any delays or additional costs. For example, you can locate saturated insulation within a roof build up. This can then be backed up with core samples to determine if a roof can be locally stripped to remove damaged insulation, or whether a full strip is required. This means you can be more accurate when working with contractors, helping them to accurately price work and identify the most suitable approach, such as removal and replacement of localised roof areas. Thermal imaging is said to provide a wealth of information the naked eye cannot see. It allows you to narrow down the locations where destructive core samples are required. It also provides a visual representation of how the roof is performing thermally. http://gbr.sika.com/en SFS, a manufacturer of fastener solutions for the building envelope, has published a new catalogue for its flat roofing product range, which is presented in a ‘user-friendly’ format. Now available to download at www.sfsintec.co.uk, as well as a printed catalogue, the new 200+ page catalogue is a comprehensive update to the previous issue to reflect the range of products and systems offered by SFS. The catalogue details the solutions available for the three main SFS systems: the isofast fully metallic system, the isotak thermal break fastening system and the isoweld induction welding system. The easy-to-use format is said to make finding the right SFS product ‘quick and simple’, and encompasses fastener solutions for steel, concrete and timber deck, along with critical decks and a new section for flashings, upstands and termination bars. It reportedly also includes details of fasteners for metal deck to steel and timber structures, as well as information on SFS’s tools and accessories. The catalogue is available on SFS’s interactive e-Literature platform at www. sfsliterature.com, along with its roofing and cladding catalogue. Martyn Holloway, SFS flat roofing business unit manager, said: “The new catalogue provides an easy to follow guide to our range of fastening systems for flat roofing. This will assist customers to choose a reliable, fully-approved, and easy to install solution for fixing membrane, insulation and termination bar to every type of substrate.” The new flat roofing catalogue is said to be part of SFS’s extensive programme of support for roofing contractors, specifiers and membrane suppliers. This includes UK-wide sales and technical teams who provide on-site pull-out testing, wind load calculations and resources including BIM data and project support where required, as well as training facilities to ensure the best possible result in the finished building envelope. You can download the new Flat Roofing Catalogue at www.sfsintec. co.uk, or use the e-Literature site to navigate the catalogue online at www.sfsliterature.com 078 MARCH 2018 RCIMAG.COM “Thermal imaging is said to provide a wealth of information the naked eye cannot see. It allows you to narrow down the locations where destructive core samples are required”


RCI March 2018
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