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LWRA VIEWPOINT candidate, towards the cost of the course. This will be tendered for by the association before February 26, 2018. In addition, up to £880 per candidate, based on the number of training modules purchased, is also available, and an ‘Achievement Grant’ of £600 for the individual attaining an NVQ Level 2. Like many other industry federations, the LRWA has an agreed matrix of approved training modules with the CITB, and with the new changes, there will be a tiered scoring mechanism for the short duration training modules, such as the SAP. A value has been put on these training modules, and any future grant will be based on this total value. Special Upskilling Programme A Special Upskilling Programme (SUP) is also delivered by the LRWA to provide appropriate skills necessary for experienced operatives in the roofing sector. The course can be taken in a single block or over several days, and following training, candidates are assessed on-site at NVQ Level 2 to complete the SUP. With the SUP, the number of training days listed against each module is the minimum requirement for the learner to achieve in both practical and theory-based knowledge. This will alter depending on the operative’s existing experience and current level of skills listed in 064 FEBRUARY 2018 RCIMAG.COM their ‘Profiling Document’, which the employer should have completed before training began. A minimum of six days without optional modules is required for the SUP, providing the criteria in the Profiling Document is met. From April 1, the current CITB grant package for the SUP will not be available at the existing enhanced rates. To continue delivering individual modules or days contained within the LRWA SUP scheme for example, the association will have to register to become an approved training organisation. Any grant will then be paid to eligible employers based on allocated cost per module for training delivered by the LRWA. When operatives successfully complete the relevant NVQ or SQV (Scottish Vocational Qualification), an ‘achievement grant’ will also be available to eligible employers. Due to the CITB being unable to offer the same funding route for SUPs as they are proposing for the uptake of SAPs, employers can reach out to associations, such as the LRWA for guidance on how to support new candidates through training. Moving forward, one option for the LRWA for example, is to explore ‘flexible funding’ with the CITB to help deliver enhanced training programmes to support the demand for up-skilling in the industry. Further meetings between the CITB and associations like the LRWA have been set up to take place over the next three months, which will finalise the SAP and SUP funding decisions. The LRWA will continue to keep its members and the wider industry informed as new developments take place. Driving quality through training The key to achieving quality standards in our sector is the appropriate training of operatives. Some smaller roofing contractors may not have the capacity or budget to up-skill their teams, yet without it, operatives are less likely to be installing a safe, compliant system, and it’s worth considering the long-term benefits of quality training for the team. Many different flat roofing systems are emerging into the market every year – requiring varying levels of application subject to the chemistry type – so it’s important that contractors have the skills in place to provide a sound waterproofing system for the end-user. www.lrwa.org.uk/training Continued from page 62 WELWYNTOOL_Q 26/01/2018 15:11 Page 1 Untitled-3 1 02/02/2018 15:23


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