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RCI Feb 2018

Project1_Layout 1 07/05/FLAT ROOFING & WATERPROOFING SYSTEMS Around three years ago, IKO supplied a number of its products to refurbish ‘Scott’s Hut’, the base for the tragic attempt to be the first to the South Pole. Following the success of that refurbishment, IKO was approached by architects advising the UK Antarctica Heritage Trust (UKAHT) on the conservation of Base Y on Horseshoe Island. IKO was asked to recommend and supply the materials most suitable for the latest building to be repaired, as part of the complex Antarctic conservation programme. Base Y is an inactive, but relatively unaltered and completely equipped British Antarctic research station, which was occupied in March 1955 until August 1960. The project to repair and restore it is part of the UKAHT’s plan to preserve various sites in Antarctica, which are judged to be of historic significance. Difficult access to Horseshoe island Base Y is designated as Historic Site No. 63 – a historic site and monument under the Antarctic treaty. Access, materials and work practices are closely regulated. Due to the difficult access to the island, all materials must be transported to the site by hand – no mechanical transport is possible, and even dogs, which were used when the base was operational are banned. The IKO technical department had 066 FEBRUARY 2018 RCIMAG.COM comprehensive discussions with London-based Kennedy O’Callaghan Architects who are overseeing the project. This involved examining the plans and products used in the construction of the pre-fabricated structure back in the 1950s, then identifying the best modern products to match the original roofing. “The use of materials, which are historically correct and as close to the originals as possible, is of upmost importance,” said Janie Price, a partner at Kennedy O’Callaghan. “Their ability to perform in the Antarctic, withstanding winds of 90-150 mph, and a temperature range from -10°C to +3°C is crucial.” With this in mind, IKO supplied 25 rolls of IKO Challenger SBS with a sand finish to match the originally installed Ruberoid products as closely as possible (the Ruberoid brand now owned by IKO). The membrane has a polyester base for toughness and durability, and an SBS-modified bitumen coating. IKOpro High Performance Roofing Felt Adhesive products have also been supplied to bond the membrane to the roof to avoid hot work installation, as specified. The first part of the project involved the UKAHT sending a team to Horseshoe Island in January 2017 to carry out temporary repairs and gather samples. This confirmed the condition of the existing materials. The original roof on the main hut had held up well because there had been some maintenance done over the years, but in the past, no-one appreciated the significance of the outbuildings, so they had suffered badly, with holes and leaks exposing them to the worst of the Antarctic weather. Once on-site, the team made a temporary repair using IKOpro Roofing Felt Adhesive, and IKO Challenger SBS. This was applied over the original Ruberoid roof. Samples of the original were then collected for analysis. The work was carried out in the Antarctic spring, over a four-week period, but in order to have four weeks on-site, the workers have to schedule the work within a 12-week window, to allow for transportation of materials and weather delays. The next part of the process is to identify the best modern materials to complete a fuller conservation project in the future. It’s likely the original roof contained asbestos, so the UKAHT has to decide whether to try to remove it (with all IKO supplies historic Antarctica refurb project Martin Fisher, technical manager of IKO Plc, discusses how the company was approached to supply materials for the conservation of Base Y on Horseshoe Island Above: The original base. Right: Some of the outbuildings on Horsehoe Island were in need of desperate repair Base Y located on Horseshoe Island Continued on page 68


RCI Feb 2018
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