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RCI Feb 2018

Zink INDUSTRY NEWS 01992 801927 www.almhm.co.uk New BBA RiR scheme cuts inspections by 50% Contractors carrying out room in roof (RIR) installations can take advantage of a new scheme designed to make it quicker and more costeffective to ensure work complies with regulations. The new Room in Roof Insulation Installer Scheme has been introduced by the British Board of Agrément (BBA) to simplify the compliance element of each installation, offering approved installers an all-inclusive service with just one inspection required. Until now, installers have been required to gain individual inspections for pitched roof insulation and internal wall insulation installations, both of which, incurred costs. The new BBA scheme is reportedly the first of its kind in the industry, and aims to lower costs and save time for contractors. Ken O’Sullivan, head of audit and inspection at the BBA, said: “Properly insulating loft conversions and rooms in roofs can retain as much as 25% of heat generated in a domestic property. But it must be done correctly to ensure the work complies with energy efficiency, ventilation, and fire protection standards and regulations. It is a specialist job that must also take into account the age and construction of the property. “This new initiative, developed after feedback from our competent installer scheme members, leverages the technical excellence offered by the BBA and its Approved Installer network to deliver properly and safely insulated rooms in roofs in a more cost-effective and timely way. It also provides added value to our registered installers, and an opportunity of cost savings. The initiative is separate from existing BBA assessment and surveillance schemes.” Existing BBA Approved Installers need only ask to join the RIR scheme. They will then have a minimum of one site-in-progress assessed, with the site inspection consisting of an examination of the records and workin progress for the installation. The site will also be inspected during critical stages to ensure coverage of key operations, including setting out, detailing around openings, and finishing. Works will be assessed against the agreed method statement and established best practice. Each year will see an office visit and a series of site visits, based on the percentage of the total number of installations. It is a requirement of the scheme that insulation is installed only by approved installers; installation methods are critical to the performance and product life of the insulation and overall performance of the project. Installers not yet BBA-approved must register and will be required to have office audits to assess their professionalism, taking into account insurance, customer care, and complaint processes, training records, as well as technical evidence and competencies of the installers to carry out the work. Installers must be able to demonstrate that they are fully conversant with the technical requirements, and for Green Deal installations, of PAS 2030, and the Green Deal Code of Practice. Additionally, with PAS registration, the previous individual measures (pitched roof and internal wall insulation) would have required a certain percent of installations to be inspected. Therefore, the number of inspections required would be higher. Being approved for the BBA Room in the Roof scheme means a reduction in the number of inspections needed. The scheme will be overseen by BBA technical assessors who are fully trained to deliver independent, unbiased inspections. 008 FEBRUARY 2018 RCIMAG.COM Copper Stainless Richard Beresford, chief executive of the National Federation of Builders (NFB) has released a statement saying that late payment is still a problem for UK construction firms, despite widespread acknowledgement that this is unacceptable. His full statement is detailed below. Time to take a fresh look at procurement “In 2007, the NFB was one of the first organisations to take issue with how the government’s approach to procurement and frameworks put SMEs at a distinct disadvantage. A disproportionately onerous administrative bidding process costs thousands, even tens of thousands of pounds, win or lose. Some of our members report spending up to 30 days each year on bidding for work. Any hint of financial instability instantly rules companies out, even if that instability is down to retention payments being withheld by companies further up the supply chain, and not because of poor business management. “We do have mechanisms in place which have levelled the playing field. However, central government and local authorities, where SMEs gain most work, do not apply them. We don’t need additional legislation; we simply need to enforce what is in place. “Construction has a standard prequalification form, which the NFB helped develop with the BSI and the now Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy. Take up is pitiful, despite the government requiring it on public construction contracts. This form helps level the playing field by removing the timeconsuming repetitive nature of the process. “The Construction Act requires public bodies to pay undisputed invoices within 30 days. NFB members consistently report that public sector clients, including central government, do not pay on time. When you factor in some main contractors imposing 120-day payment terms, £10.5 billion withheld in retention payments, and around £22 billion in annual SME turnover is paid late, it becomes clear why so many SMEs are in a precarious situation. “There is an adjudication process in place, but many companies do not use it for fear of jeopardising future work. When major contract after major contract is awarded to a small group of the usual suspects, smaller companies are caught between a rock and a hard place. “According to Construction News in August 2017, the UK’s top 10 construction contractors posted combined revenues of £31.9 billion; but a £52.9 million loss. This is not sustainable. “If we are to recruit apprentices and deliver world-class building and infrastructure projects, not only should the industry pay and train better, we need the government to be a better client who pays on time, and takes a long-term view on the health of those businesses its practices affect. “The NFB and its members provide a clear voice and act on those words. Our procurement work with some local authorities has yielded results for SMEs and local economies without a reduction in quality. One of our members, Colmore Tang Construction, is offering to pay its subcontractors that have been affected by the collapse of Carillion earlier than their contract terms in order to provide certainty. This is the kind of collaborative leadership the industry needs and represents the best construction has to offer.” Late payment practices put SMEs at a disadvantage, says NFB The Liquid Roofing and Waterproofing Association (LRWA) has donated £2,500 to a charity set up by Sir Bobby Charlton called ‘Find A Better Way’. The Cheshire-based charity helps civilian landmine blast survivors, their families and communities to ‘heal and rebuild their lives’. As the Association’s chosen charity of the year, Cliff Weston, LRWA chairman, and David Broom, director of an LRWA manufacturer member, Moy Materials, visited the Find A Better Way headquarters in Knutsford, Cheshire, to present a cheque to the football legend himself. The majority of donations were raised at the LRWA Awards held in November 2017, where a Manchester United shirt signed by Sir Bobby Charlton was auctioned. David Broom’s pictured right generous bid won the signed shirt, and he received his prize during the cheque presentation. For more information about the charity and its work, visit www.findabetterway.org.uk LRWA supports Sir Bobby Charlton charity Left to right: Cliff Weston, LRWA chairman, Sir Bobby Charlton, founder of the Find A Better Way charity, and David Broom, director of Moy Materials


RCI Feb 2018
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