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RCI Feb 2018

Project1_Layout 1 07/05/FIXING & FASTENERS EJOT has recently announced what Management changes at EJOT UK appears from the outside to be something of a ‘cabinet reshuffl e’ of its UK management team. However, in reality, it is far from a shake up, with business as usual. The key personnel involved have been operating progressively in their new roles for some 18 months, as the company planned a controlled expansion. Global demand The company is now seeing unprecedented demand for its building envelope products globally, so it is no coincidence that outgoing managing director, Chris Middleton, heads-up several of EJOT’s operating interests worldwide. Chris, who joined the company’s Yorkshire manufacturing base in 2007, will help to maintain continuity as chair of the EJOT UK board. The role of managing director is now taken up by Robert Hardstaff (pictured top, right), who has been the company’s fi nancial controller since 2004. Robert said: “Legislating for expansion to remain in line with the EJOT Group’s global expansion is something that has been planned for years, rather than months. We have worked hard Craig Johnson, technical services manager at SFS, explains why clients and forward-thinking contractors are increasingly demanding technically superior fasteners to deliver on performance and aesthetic goals 080 FEBRUARY 2018 RCIMAG.COM to gain the confi dence of the EJOT ownership in Germany, but our track record as a unit over the last 10 years has proved our capability.” Whilst the ethos behind the EJOT model is one of ‘solutions based engineering’, many overlook that the company’s knowledgebase has emerged from two key markets: automotive engineering and building and construction. Robert explained: “Applications for our products cross many sectors, but as a generalisation, our sales and application engineers have traditionally serviced these two areas of business. With the recent acquisition of the Finnish manufacturer, Sormat for example, it will be part of my job to manage our interests as holistically as possible.” Natural progression too, has played a part in the new look team. Readers of the January issue of RCI may already be aware that Howard Jennings (pictured centre, right) is retiring after 24 years, largely as sales manager for building and construction fastenings. Howard’s role is being taken up by Richard Bowhay (pictured centre, left), who himself, has been with EJOT UK for 20 years. Richard has worked closely with Howard over a long period to ensure a smooth transition, allowing the latter more time to concentrate on export markets. Howard’s retirement coupled with demand from EJOT’s subsidiaries around the world has opened the door for Ben Gallant (pictured bottom) to take up the mantle of export sales manager. Ben joined the company in 2002, and has held several niche sales responsibilities including solar and ETICS products. With Chris Middleton spearheading international interests, operations manager, Simon Pearson, will lead the UK research and development team. www.ejot.co.uk One small component, many benefi ts Fasteners are highly technical products, which hold the key to delivering building envelopes that stand the test of time, structurally and visually. But as clients and architects are demanding ever greater assurances about the long-term performance of buildings, it has never been more important to have the full picture on the fastener options available. The durability of the fastener fundamentally depends on the material used in its manufacture. Coated carbon steel fasteners are usually insuffi cient to provide long-term resistance to corrosion because of the damage their coatings suffer during installation. This exposes the metal to the elements, so the fastener corrodes rapidly on exposure to humidity, leading to premature failure of the envelope. Stainless steel fasteners are a much more reliable choice. They are usually manufactured from two grades of stainless steel – both austenitic; A2 (also known as grade 304) and A4 (also known as grade 316). Applications in which the humidity is high and where there is a combination of certain chemicals, tend to demand another type of stainless steel, A5. A2, A4 and A5 austenitic stainless steel fasteners conform to BS5427: 2016 – a code of practice for the use of profi led sheet for roof and wall cladding on buildings. They contain at least 17% chromium and at least 8% nickel, with molybdenum added for enhanced corrosion resistance. Crucially, they do not have a coating that is susceptible to damage, relying instead on the inherent properties of stainless steel for their high resistance to corrosion. The rise of A4 stainless steel A2 stainless steel fasteners are generally warranted up to 25 years, which has driven their popularity in a wide range of applications. However, the terms and conditions of warranties can vary between manufacturers and distributors. A4 stainless steel fasteners offer improved corrosion resistance, durability, and a much longer warranty of up to 40-year service life. In recent years, there has been an increase in demand for A4 stainless steel fasteners for all applications, driven by specifi ers and clients seeking an enhanced quality product for extended building longevity. Aligned with performance is aesthetics, ensuring the fastener heads are consistent with the façade or roofi ng panels. Powder coating is the most effective way to apply a colour fi nish to the fastener heads, and when applied to A2 or A4 stainless steel fasteners, this combination ensures a façade will retain its integrity over a long service life, without suffering defects that impact on the visual appeal of the structure. The powder coating process delivers a high quality, decorative and robust fi nish, which is less prone to fading. With excellent weathering resistance and colour stability in exposed external applications, it provides fasteners that match. This is why SFS powder coats its coloured fasteners, available to meet any RAL colour and in special fi nishes – supported by a 12-year colour stability warranty. www.sfsintec.co.uk


RCI Feb 2018
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